Heimskringla
Dine in the halls of heroes
Lif 
3rd - Nov - 2011 - 12:05 am - Useless knowledge
logeirr: (Viking2)
While I looked up a translation for Regin Smiður, I stumbled over this word and since I love etymology, I had to look it up c: So have at thee:

wroth [rəʊθ rɒθ]
adj; Old English wrāth; related to Old Saxon wrēth, Old Norse reithr, Old High German reid curly haired

I am reading the Völsunga saga currently and I've had this mental image of Regin as a dark haired, grimy smith with wild eyes, barrel chested and tree trunk like arms. Turns out he's actually a dwarf. Dödöt. As Völuspá and Reginsmál relate him to the dvergar, I suppose its a given fact and I can scratch my beautifully constructed design and start anew. Baaaah.
Then again, I had been wondering, how Regin could have such a strange family without displaying any of the genetic peculiarities himself. I even wondered, with whom his father had lain to beget an otter and a dragon as sons respectively. But Hreiðmarr is the King of the Dwarves himself, sooooo there you go. These dwarves, I tell you. Crazy shape shifters, the lot of them...

Talking about dwarves: Andvari who loses his gold and the ring Andvarinaut (which he both curses) to Loki, is also a shape shifter, living beneath the waterfall Andvarafors as a luce. For some reason, he reminds me of Gollum.... Oh yeah, he's apparently the equivalent to Alberich, another King* of the Dwarves (or Elves?), as well, who can turn invisible and guards the Nibelungen hoard. BUT! And that's the interesting part: apparently, some scholars see him as the original Oberon, which is the French translation of his name. The more you know *rainbow*.

I still cannot believe Regin is a midget. :(

*sobsobsob*

Anyways, here an illustration from the Ramsund rune carving to cheer me up and to mark a worthy ending to a silly post (I cannot even begin to explain how funny I find Sigurd down there, stabbing Fafnir and all. And that face of the dragon OHGOD WHAT IS AIR):
*I swear, they call anyone rich and important enough to be mentioned in these sagas a king...

27th - Sep - 2011 - 09:41 pm - Orkneyjar
logeirr: (LOTR)
So, [livejournal.com profile] salty_catfish and I are touring through Scotland. And somehow, like the last time I went abroad, it turned into a Viking Research Trip (The Pictish Trail, it's a trap!). For that very reason, we are now on Orkney - a life long wish of two years finally came true aaah. What a lovely accent these people have here.

Yesterday was a very strange day, with mocking rainbows on our way along Skye's coast line (Hell, we even checked into a B+B which was called 'Rainbow view' with a very pink room). Didn't manage to do our pensum of driving that day, however. I suppose, at least we gained XPs and perhaps even a Level Up by learning how to change a tire. Life Skills, you cannot buy them.
15th - May - 2011 - 11:50 pm - Töluð orð verða ekki aftur tekin.
logeirr: (Thor: Loki)
Loki spake:
"I have said to the gods - and the sons of the god, 
The things that whetted my thoughts;
But before thee alone - do I now go forth,
For thou fightest well, I ween.

Ale hast thou brewed - but, Ægir, now
Such feasts shalt thou make no more;
O'er all that thou hast - which is here within
Shall play the flickering flames,
And thy back shall be burnt with fire."
 
I am still fangirling hardcore over the Thor movie and Loki in particular. Nancy, Anne and I went to see it again today, we had such a blast. This movie truely is pure fangirl service, imho.

 
Nomnomnom. But the best thing? The newly created kinkmeme [livejournal.com profile] norsekink! Soooo many awesome prompts and sexy tiems, I can hardly believe it. This fandom? It's going to be one of the finest.

Anyways, please listen to this song, it is super good: Dust Bowl Dance by Mumford & Sons *_* Also 'Roll away your stone' by the same band is equally enthralling and so so catchy.

This is all c:

I know this is hardly of interest to anyone, but I was close to naming this post "ljúgið eða segið satt" (Lie or speak true.)

[edit] Super super awesome mythological Loki + Thor + Odin Story: A Game of Shapes !!!! True to character and sources. Aaaaah *instant fav forever*
Also, if you were wondering about Odin's "No, Loki." at the end, here's a little story which explores the meaning behind it. Very IC, imho: Letting Go.

18th - Mar - 2011 - 01:24 am - back to nerd mode
logeirr: (TLU: Hunter)
{Edit: In case this wasn't clear enough, this is me fangirling. About Hetalia. OBVIOUSLY.}

I started reading Tacitus' Germania, and figured that quite a lot of social structures have not changed that much (granted, Tacitus does not delve as deep as he could have - but the few limited views he grants us, I find quite telling). They coincide with Viking social structure quite nicely. Does not sound that amazing (yet), but if you consider most sources on Viking society were written during the high middle ages... that's a gap of about 1000 odd years. Has so little changed? Or rather, are the fundamental powers still intact because of the things which have NOT changed (landscape, climate, foes)? Plus, isn't the sheer preservation in the face of Christianity just astonishing! Regardless, using what we know of Viking homosexuality and its hazards to back us up, Tacitus' record on punishment suddenly gains another level of meaning - So lets recapture, and then assume...

[Licet apud concilium accusare quoque et discrimen capitis intendere. distinctio poenarum ex delicto: proditores et transfugas arboribus suspendunt, ignavos et imbelles et corpore infames caeno ac palude, iniecta insuper crate, mergunt. Diversitas supplicii illuc respicit, tamquam scelera ostendi oporteat, dum puniuntur, flagitia abscondi.]

In their councils an accusation may be preferred or a capital crime prosecuted. Penalties are distinguished according to the offense. Traitors and deserters are hanged on trees; the coward, the unwarlike, the man stained with abominable vices, is plunged into the mire of the morass, with a hurdle put over him. This distinction in punishment means that crime, they think, ought, in being punished, to be exposed, while infamy ought to be buried out of sight.
                                                                                                                     - Germania, Ch. XII
 

I am merely speculating, of course. Considering virðing/drengskapr (similar to lat. virtus) as the forever unachievable ideal/social system, its origin and power it undeniably had over Vikings, the punishment for cowards does not seem so out of place anymore. The opposite of honor is shame, and what shames a man more if not meeting the ideal - an ideal, that is the ultimate goal of each individual. If a man is less than what he is supposed to be - what is he, then? Something different, the opposite. He must, by default, thus be female (or an animal.) Now, I won't open that Pandora's box today of how women were viewed - mostly because Tacitus' record of that differs a little from later Viking society's standard - and skip right into the actual argument instead:

Perversity, "the man stained with abominable vices", is regarded as severe as cowardice. How do these two coincide? Taking into account that only the receiving partner in a homosexual encounter had to suffer the full penalty of his sordid (or should I say sorðinn? Hurhurhur) act while the active partner is undoubtedly the victor, homosexuality was first and foremost a demonstration of dominance.It was a practice used against enemies and competitors as means of establishing a position within society. There was nothing shameful in using a man like a woman, but certainly in being used, in submitting and becoming less than a man. Simply the accusation of being a coward and thus unmanly, was so utterly shameful, a discredit disrupting not only to the man's equilibrium (helgi), but his kin's, that the Icelandic and Norwegian laws demanded the death (or exile) of the accuser, if it was unfounded.

Due to Tacitus' accumulation, we can easily make the connection between the coward, the unmanly and the sexual deviant. They all denote the same kind of person. It is obvious, then, why they would all be doomed to the same fate as well. Unlike traitors and deserters, whose crime it were to nourish different morals and not a fundamental flaw in their nature. One could even assume, that hanging traitors up on trees for all to see, the meaning becomes "Don't do it", as opposed to the unmistakable message of "Don't be it" when it comes to the second group of offenders.

I am not sure whether anyone has compared Tacitus' account of Germanic life/costume etc with the much later age of the Vikings, but I am sure, I wasn't the first one to follow that train of thought.  Aaaaanyways. What's more important right now... OMG I CAN HAZ?

13th - Mar - 2011 - 11:58 pm - Heldensage! I should have known!
logeirr: (SW: Qui-Gon Bitch Plz)
Went to the pub today for the pub quiz. Was awesome. We didn't make it, only the 6th place (out of nine?) but what the hell. I could only contribute with two things: the names of three sexologists (Kinsey, Hirschfeld & Westheimer) and Kitty Genovese. GUESS WHY.
I even drank a glass of beer (Strongbow) and a shot glass filled with ... something... fruity tasting. Nice. Afterwards we scribbled animals with our eyes closed - ah the hilarity.

But that wasn't what I was going to say. I found the DB Kinkmeme.
Someone requested:

>>>GINYU FORCE ORGY

Nuuuuuuuuuuu. The mental image whyyyyyyyyyyyyy aaarhgjhdjhskdl.
17th - Feb - 2011 - 06:46 pm - Hávamál
logeirr: (4)
Ár skal rísa,
sá er annars vill
fé eða fjör hafa;
sjaldan liggjandi ulfr
lær of getr
né sofandi maðr sigr.
Early shall rise
who has designs
on another's land or life:
Seldomly a lying wolf
captures prey,
neither does a sleeping man victory. 
                                                              
Keep this in mind, folks!

And if you want useless trivia, here you go: Haddingjar
7th - Feb - 2011 - 02:34 pm - SOÐLICE!
logeirr: (Sherlock: Not a Date)
write
    O.E. writan "to score, outline, draw the figure of," later "to set down in writing" (class I strong verb; past tense wrat, pp. writen), from P.Gmc. *writanan "tear, scratch" (cf. O.Fris. writa "to write," O.S. writan "to tear, scratch, write," O.N. rita "write, scratch, outline," O.H.G. rizan "to write, scratch, tear," Ger. reißen "to tear, pull, tug, sketch, draw, design"), outside connections doubtful. Words for "write" in most I.E languages originally mean "carve, scratch, cut" (cf. L. scribere, Gk. grapho, Skt. rikh-); a few originally meant "paint" (cf. Goth. meljan, O.C.S. pisati, and most of the modern Slavic cognates).

Also hätte das dt. "schreiben" auch als "reißen" oder "ritzen" enden können. Stattdessen haben wir uns ans Lateinische gehalten. Schade, schade.
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